Waiting for My Peas to Dry Up

HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+


”These are named after Rev. William Archibald Spooner of Oxford, England, who was famous for such pronouncements as “Three cheers for our queer old dean” when he meant “dear old queen.” At a wedding he once said, “It is kisstomary to cuss the bride,” instead of “customary to kiss the bride.


”Pronouncements made by children often seem to make no sense and come clear only years later. For example, my little brother, who was just a toddler at the time, loved canned fruit cocktail. Inevitably, each time he came upon a cherry, he would exclaim what to us other family members sounded for all the world like: “Boo-a- boo! Pee on a rabbit!”


For many years the true meaning of this pronouncement never came clear until I related it to my wife one day.


“What he was saying,” she calmly clarified, “was, ‘Boy, oh boy! Piece of a red one!’”


Sometimes I guess you just have to turn to someone well versed in the subtleties of baby talk to let you know what you missed.

Sometimes, try as we may, we misspeak or even mishear things. It happens to the best of us, and most times these mishaps are not remarkable. Other times, however, they can be hilarious. Many people mishear song lyrics.


There is even a Web site dedicated to misheard song lyrics – www.kissthisguy.com. The Web site’s name is an actual frequently misheard lyric from Jimi Hendrix’s “Purple Haze,” which, properly sung, is, “’Scuse me while I kiss the sky.” Lots of people heard “’Scuse me while I kiss this guy” instead.


Other misheard classics on the site include “She’s got a tic in her eye,” instead of “She’s got a ticket to ride” from the Beatles and “There’s a bathroom on the right” instead of “There’s a bad moon on the rise” from Creedence Clearwater Revival. My own misheard lyric was from “Sunshine of Your Love” by Cream. The groups sings, “I’ll be with you, darling, now/I’ll be with you till my seas all dry up.” It sounded to me as though they were singing, “I’ll be with you till my peas all dry up.” I was thinking of those old-fashioned TV dinners. If you put one in the oven for too long, the frozen peas would dry up and be shriveled.


I encountered another situation years ago when a new friend, sitting at the dinner table with his wife, happily exclaimed, “I’m in love with this guy!” It took a few drinks and deep consideration of his New Jersey

WAITING FOR MY PEAS TO DRY UP

accent before my wife and I figured out he was saying, “I’m in love with the sky!” Quite a difference.


Misheard lyrics aside, there’s another category of verbal faux pas called malapropisms, in which the speaker inadvertently substitutes a similar-sounding word for the one intended, often with amusing results.


My daughter, for example, heard her mother-in-law diagnose her ennui after the birth of her son as “post-mortem depression” as opposed to “postpartum depression.” My son’s co-worker remarked someone was “as hairy as Saskatchewan” rather than Sasquatch.


I know some people who make up their own pseudo-mal-apropisms, knowing perfectly well what they’re doing, such as a good friend of mine who said of an acquaintance, “She’s not overweight, she’s o-BEAST!”


Then there are “spoonerisms,” which are defined as “a verbal error in which a speaker accidentally transposes the initial sounds or letters of two or more words, often to humorous effect.

FRANK KOURT

Frank Kourt is a staff writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Frank Kourt