HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

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WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

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against using any type of phone conversation or voice-to-text features while driving, including hands-free and Bluetooth devices.


If you become confused while you’re driving; if you’re concerned about your ability to drive safely; if others have expressed concerns about your driving, it might be best to stop driving entirely. Consider taking the bus, using a van service, hiring a driver or taking advantage of other local transportation options.


REFERENCES:


SAFETY TIPS FOR OLDER DRIVERS

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer and blogger who has a keen interest in health and wellness. She can be approached through her blog (www.aha-now.com) and Web site, www.harleenasingh.com. Connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

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Driving can sometimes be challenging for older adults. As we age, factors such as decreased vision, impaired hearing, slowed motor reflexes and worsening health conditions can become problematic. Those who are more at risk include seniors ages 80 to 84 years and male drivers age 65 years and older.


Here are some safety tips for older drivers: