LOOK OUT FOR YOUR EYES

As you begin making your resolution to be healthier this new year, don’t leave out two of the most important parts of your body: your eyes. With the demands that are put on our eyes every day, it is essential to take care of them and even exercise them to strengthen them and possibly improve your vision.  In the past, people were hunters, farmers and gatherers. They were used to looking over far distances to seek prey and other possible sources of food. But now we live in a 2D world, where....

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SENSORY INTEGRATION IMPORTANT FOR BALANCE

What happened the last time you went on the Mad Tea Party ride at DisneyWorld? Did you enjoy yourself initially, but as the ride went on, did you start to feel sick and disoriented? When you closed your eyes, however, you probably felt much better. And you were immensely glad when the ride ended and you could get your bearings again.

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VISION THERAPY AND ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY

The eye is amazing. Did you know more than 1.9 million fibers come from the eye into the brain? Each of those fibers creates its own pathway to the brain and has its own distinct function. So when someone has a stroke or other acquired brain injury (ABI), vision is often affected.  ABIs include concussions suffered in severe sports-related hits or a car accident, as well as cerebral or vascular strokes. An ABI can affect both neurological pathways in the eye, the focal or parvocellular pathway, which....

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disease can be slowed down and the vision you still have can be saved. As with diabetes or high blood pressure, the ultimate goal with glaucoma is maintenance. Here, too, prevention is worth multiple pounds of cure.

GLAUCOMA: DON’T LET ‘SNEAK THIEF’ STEAL YOUR EYESIGHT

until they realize half their vision is gone. That is why glaucoma is called the “sneak thief of sight.” The sooner it is caught, the better able your eye doctor will be to keep it under control.


One of the first signs that you have glaucoma is a loss of peripheral or side vision. Visual field testing can check it. You may also see halos around lights or experience narrow or tunnel vision. Your eye doctor will check for glaucoma by dilating your eyes. This will give him a better view of your optic nerve. The pressure in the eyes often damages this nerve. The doctor will also perform a tonometry test to check the fluid pressure in your eyes. Treatment may include eye drops taken once or twice daily. These drops help relieve the pressure by either increasing the outflow of the aqueous humor or reducing its production. Another option is laser surgery, which can increase the flow of fluid from the eye. One microsurgery procedure is used to create a new channel to help drain the fluid and relieve the pressure in the eye. You should talk about your options with your eye doctor.


Glaucoma is essentially a neurodegenerative disease. It cannot be cured and lost vision can-not be restored. However, with proper treatment, the progress of the

DR. RICK GRAEBE

Dr. Graebe received both his B.S degree in Visual Science and Doctorate of Optometry from Indiana University. He is a Behavioral Optometrist and learning expert. He has been in private practice here in the Bluegrass area for the past 32 years.

more articles by dr rick graebe

Age takes its toll on all parts of the body, even the eyes. While conditions such as glaucoma are not necessarily inevitable as we get older, they are still possibilities that can change the way we see. It always pay to practice foresight – it just may save your eyesight.


Glaucoma is a rather complex disease. Simply put, it occurs when fluid pressure builds up in your eyes. Approximately two and a half quarts of fluid, called aqueous humor, pumps through the eyes every day, providing nutrients to the inside of the eyes. This fluid is constantly being pumped in and out of your eyes. The pumping keeps the fluid clear and clean so you can see well through it. The way glaucoma works can be compared to a faucet and drain. As long as both parts are working fine and everything flows smoothly, you have no problem with backups or clogs. But sometimes the fluid gets blocked instead of flowing out of your eyes as normal. The blockage causes the pressure in your eyes, so the balance between inflow and outflow is important. A person can be born with glaucoma, but that only happens rarely. Usually the condition is related to age. Your risk of developing glaucoma rises a percentage point with each decade.


Unfortunately, glaucoma has no warning signals. The condition is painless and the pressure buildup that steals your eyesight is so slow and steady that most people have no idea they even have glaucoma