HOBBIES ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Do you have a hobby? Hobbies can give meaning and purpose to your life in retirement. As Robert Putnam points out in his book, Bowling Alone, it’s easy to discount the importance of hobbies and social engagements. Putnam details the widespread decline in civic engagement, from PTA memberships to neighborhood potlucks and bowling leagues. Over a couple of generations, Americans have misplaced the concept of free time.

SPECIAL PLANS FOR YOUR SPECIAL PEOPLE

Lily is a beautiful, active and full of personality toddler who happens to have Down syndrome. Lily’s parents and I have been friends for years and I have the continuing pleasure of watching Lily and her siblings grow up. While Lily is becoming a physical therapy rock star and hitting all her milestones in a timely fashion, her parents have started planning for the future.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHY WE ENJOY OUR HOBBIES

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a hobby as “a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation.” Hobbies include anything from playing a musical instrument to gardening, bird watching or sewing. A hobby is a way of focusing on something you enjoy just for the sake of that enjoyment. It may also be a way to clear your mental palette. You could be stressed out by a situation at work or the challenges of raising children and need an escape.

….FULL ARTICLE

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from Living Well 60 + Magazine

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Living Well 60+ Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

LIVING WELL 60+ MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMN ARTICLES | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to living Well 60+

order in hospital set- tings. You can access the MOST form at http://kbml.ky.gov/board/Documents/MOST%20Form.pdf. The original form must accompany you in order to be recognized. You can have it on file at your hospital, but it could be found too late or you could be taken to a different hospital. If you are serious about a DNR order being followed, having a local power of attorney to act on your behalf is your best bet.

DO YOU NEED A DNR ORDER?


A DNR order does not ensure emergency responders will not do everything they can to resuscitate. In Kentucky, an additional Emergency Medical Services Do Not Resuscitate Order (EMS DNR) is needed to guarantee DNR wishes are followed outside of a hospital setting. This EMS DNR only applies to EMS personnel in a pre-hospital setting up to the doors of the hospital. Once you are in the hospital, the EMS DNR has no effect, and your other DNR order is enacted.  This form needs to be approved by the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure. You can access the EMS DNR form at https://eforms.com/ images/2018/02/Kentucky-Not-Resuscitate-Order-Form.pdf.


A new Kentucky medical order was enacted in 2015 called the Medical Order for Scope of Treatment (MOST). This form is quite comprehensive, cover- ing not only resuscitation, but also medi- cal intervention if you have a pulse or are breathing and the administration of antibiotics, fluids and nutrition. Section E of the MOST form asks if you have a living will and, if so, to certify that the MOST is consistent with the living will directive. You must fill this form out with your physician and he/she must sign it. Additionally, the MOST form needs to be approved by the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure. It is the only direct authority mandating recognition of a DNR

A do not resuscitate order (DNR) alerts all medical personnel that you do not wish to be resuscitated in case of a medical trauma. It expresses your choice to die naturally rather than be brought back to life. Emergency medical personnel must use all available measures – no matter how invasive – to save anyone’s life except when a DNR order is in place.


A DNR order is often included with other legal health documents, such as a living will, an advance directive and a power of attorney, but you can also have a stand- alone DNR order. A DNR order differs from an advance directive in that it specifies there is to be no intervention at all for any reason, whereas an advance directive outlines several contingencies of when and what type of intervention is allowed.


You can fill out a DNR order at your doctor’s office and have it kept in your medical records. You can also do so when you are admitted to a hospital if you’re conscious. If you are near death and unable to communicate and you have a living will or advance directive that makes your wishes clear, the doctor can put the DNR order in place. If you have appointed a health care agent and a DNR order is consistent with your known wishes, your agent can authorize the DNR order on your behalf. If you have not created documents directing your health care, the person who is legally authorized to make health-care decisions for you – usually your spouse or next closest relative – may be able to authorize a DNR order if they believe it is what you would have wanted.  

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela S. Hoover is a Staff Writer for Living Well 60+ Magazine

more articles by Angela S. Hoover